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rpicciotto2004

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 29

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Jul 21 11 2:45 PM

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Hello all.  My 29 still sports the old Gray Marine installed when she was built in 68.  It seems okay, but the temp of the cylinder heads is not quite the same for all of them.  Repowering at this time is out of the question for my budget, and I have been looking at a product called Rydlyme.  Has anyone had any experience with it?

David, the new stemhead and windlass are on.  Pictures follow in the next few days, when I have had a chance to use them.    

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67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#4 [url]

Jul 28 11 10:01 AM



Hi rpicciotto
Just wanted to wish you fair winds and clam seas on your voyage to Connecticut. It's so good to see someone sailing. It's amazing that we have all most the same anchor roller! my anchor rode is 1/2" nylon line with a short length of chain at the anchor,I always have my anchor at hand in the cockpit ready to deploy . I use the sheet winch to haul it in and it works very well. I am planning to leave after the 17th of Aug. on a trip from lake Erie through the Erie canal to N.Y. and on down to Florida. I've included an image of the anchor roller on my boat, the white paint in just a sealer coat to protect the epoxy from UV damage until the weather cools off enough that I can begin to paint the deck with kiwi grip. hope to hear more of your adventures....having problems uploading an image it goes to 99% then stops, i'll try later. take care, Jay

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

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#6 [url]

Jul 28 11 7:13 PM

I have been meaning to ask you: where does your rudder post exit--in the cockpit sole I assume, or I am thinking forward of the lazarette hatch? Love to see some pictures.

Cheers,

David

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#7 [url]

Jul 29 11 6:52 AM




David 
here are some pic's of the rudder detail, the bearings need to be changed, when I attempted to get the bolt out to drop the rudder, it would not budge.  it was still working fine so i did not force the issue because I was afraid to break something resulting in more lost time and expense.

 the aluminum pipe from the old rudder post up to the plate is what the previous owner used to fix the old rudder in a straight position. but now the old rudder is glassed in, so it is no longer necessary, but i have not gotten around to removing it yet 


 you can see the stubborn bolt holding the whole affair in the tube.The bolt head is countersunk so i cannot get a wrench on it either.I tried using a punch to drift it out but no luck. the bolt holding the tiller handle to the post has a new nylock nut and washers to prevent loosening and it works great so far. the new  rudder is very well balanced and takes very little effort to move the tiller







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67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

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#8 [url]

Jul 29 11 9:10 AM

Can you remove the vertical pipe now that locked the original rudder amidships? Also, is the horizontal plate extending forward into the cockpit with the arch of holes some sort of tiller lock?
 
David

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#9 [url]

Jul 29 11 11:27 AM

Hi
yes I could remove that pipe now, I thought the same thing about the arch of holes, but there is no longer a pin on the tiller to fit into the holes perhaps the tiller has been changed at some point, also the arch looks like it's the wrong way, reversed?.
I just use opposing lines looped over the end of the tiller to hold it amidships while motoring. I use  the outboard to steer in close quarters.
other projects I am trying to get done are hand holds on the coach roof forward to the front of the forward hatch. I was considering using eye bolts with a continuous line for a hand hold.
life lines etc.

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

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rpicciotto2004

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 29

#10 [url]

Oct 28 11 10:55 AM

hello abigale.  i'm sorry to confess that i haven't seen your answer until to day.  i can only explain the oversight by the fact that my mind has too many miles under the keel, and apologize for it..

by now you must have arrived or be arriving in florida.  we in connecticut lived our first frost last night and have snow forecast for tomorrow.  almost all boats, including nereus, have been hauled.  people who love water and wind, at lest me, have already begun to dream of spring, a familiar joy of winter that is physically difficult to sustain as you get older.   

if you see fit to send news, i assure you that i won't take six months to answer. 

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67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#11 [url]

Oct 30 11 5:23 PM

Hi
Unfortunately Hurricane Irene has closed portions of the Erie Canal until further notice. I was in Ohio on my way to Buffalo NY when she dumped record level rains on Vermont. My daughter and I visited several ports in Ohio and then returned home.I got my steel cradle built and my boat is now hauled out and ready for another winter.I was really looking forward to a warm winter in the south as I too suffer with degenerative disk disease, and severe arthritis. So much so I listed Abigale for sale. But I remain optimistic and look forward to an early warm spring. A site that keeps me going during the winter months is an Englishman circumnavigating around the UK he is making a video log of his journey and he call his site "keep turning left" Hope you like it. Cheers, jay


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67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

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rpicciotto2004

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 29

#12 [url]

Nov 5 11 7:53 AM

hello jay.  sorry to hear about your arthritis and its concomitant joys --i know what you are talking about. hopefully you'll be able to make it south next season.  as far as we are concerned, nereus is also safely ashore and awaiting next spring.  i'm attaching a little sketch of our last sail of the saeason.  stay well..  


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tm

Fiberglass Sander

Posts: 6

#15 [url]

Nov 14 12 11:42 AM

Hi rp,

I noted your post from last year and hope you or any other might direct me to a good source for parts for a Gray Marine Sea Scout 91.  My 1967 B29 has this engine and at some point I will need new distibutor points/rotor and maybe a carb kit.  The carb float seems to stick so no gas gets to the engine unless I tap with a hammer while cranking.  Anyway, can you or anybody else tell me a good place for points and carb parts?
Thanks for any feedback,
tm

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geeter

Fiberglass Sander

Posts: 7

#17 [url]

Nov 21 12 8:31 AM

I still have the original Sea Scout on Sandpiper (hull #37), and I couldn't be happier with the reliability and smoothness of the old engine. It was rebuilt in 2004, and ran sporadically when I first got it. While troubleshooting I discovered that the needle valve in the carb float bowl would stick intermittently, and I found it cheaper and easier to just replace the whole carb than buy a rebuild kit. I got the carb from graymarineparts.com,, but I'm not sure they always have them in stock. The thing that really turned the engine around for me was when I replaced the conventional ignition system with a breakerless ignition system from www.vannessengineering.com. I had read about Atomic 4's having ignition problems that people would solve by wiping off the inside of the distributor cap, and in every case a solid state ignition solved the problem. I highly recommend making this change, as it will probably save you a lot of grief. Van Ness is a great source for parts and information, and although it is a small company (and it's sometimes difficult to get immediate call backs, etc.) they're very helpful. The owner (whose name I don't recall) stayed on the phone with me for 40 minutes while I struggled to dial in the ignition timing.

One additional caution, the original engine-driven fuel pump on Sea Scouts has a rubber diaphragm and vents through a hole in the bottom of the pump. If the diaphragm fails, the fuel can drain from the tank through the vent hole, filling the bilge. It's a good thing to keep an eye on, and Van Ness can provide rebuilt pumps for a little peace of mind (particularly if there's any risk of introducing ethanol into the fuel system.)

Good luck. My engine runs starts immediately, runs flawlessly, and is incredibly smooth and fuel efficient.

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