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#101 [url]

Sep 19 11 8:10 PM

Greg,

I wouldn't do BilgeCote for either water or fuel--I'd be concerned about what would leach out of the paint with the water, and that fuel might eventually soften the paint. I'd stick to epoxy--it has been used a lot for barrier coating tanks, although it would not hurt to call the Gougeon Brothers (866-937-8797) and ask their opinion and procedures. If you do, please let me know what they say.

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#103 [url]

Sep 20 11 7:39 PM

Dave,

     I opened up another bucket of worms again!...here's what I found out! I called and talked with Don who is one of the Tech guy's there at Gougeon Brothers', he told me that using west system for fuel, potable water or gray water was not recommended due to all the regulations and certifications etc. and so on..However he pointed me to the website and told me to search on the subject of tanks as there was some info available which would be important. Here is the link http://www.epoxyworks.com/18/pdf/tanks.pdf  I guess even though it's not recommended there still are those who give it a shot, and I have to hand it to G brother's for laying the info out on the line giving instructions to at least make sure it's done properly! I did spot some info on page 3 that might be useful..I guess this NSF International may have some info on approved coatings. I'll check it out! 
     You know don't hold me to it but from what I've seen, these tanks on the Citation have been in service since 1978 and are just basic gelcoat on fiberglass construction. Maybe the answer is re-gelcoat the inside agian? Anyway let me know what you think..

Greg

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#104 [url]

Sep 21 11 5:32 AM

Greg,

I've read the notices in the Gougeon Brother's site some years ago, but wasn't sure if there had been a change of policy. My personal take on it is that there is probably more potential toxins to leach out of gelcoat than out of epoxy, that gelcoat is truly not any form of barrier coating, whereas epoxy is, and I'm not sure that gelcoat will adhere over epoxy. My view on gelcoat is that it is basically shiny plaster of Paris, it smooths nicely but is cosmetic only, has no strength and fails if it goes on too thin, and fails if it is applied too thick. Personally I would use epoxy, but that's just my feeling about it.

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#105 [url]

Sep 25 11 6:34 PM

Dave,

     When you have a minute check out a product called CeRam-Kote54. It's a product that's approved for coating potable water tanks and such. I called and talked guy who heads up the Marine Div. "super nice" he said it was great stuff and perfect for the water/fuel tanks and also great for bulkheads and the bilge. He told me he's restoring a Morgan 35 and is using the coating on it!  No work don't this weekend, ended up at West Marine for the new Marleon fiting I needed for the tanks..I junked the old stuff! Let me know what you think.

Greg

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#107 [url]

Sep 26 11 7:55 PM

Dave,

Yeah your right! they need to do some work on there website! That's why I emailed I couldn't find any pricing. Turns out a Qt is $37.00 and some change..not to bad....It's on the way! so standby!

Greg

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#108 [url]

Oct 20 11 7:28 PM

Dave,

Just a quick one! I finally got the tanks sanded and cleaned so I plan on spraying them over the weekend. I had to round up another tip for my spraygun, a 2.2 nozzle! guess it's thick stuff...anyway standby for some pics and info!

Greg

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#109 [url]

Oct 23 11 4:32 PM

Dave,

     Here is the update on the painting. The CeRam-Kote looks outstanding! it covered beautifully makes the tanks look like new again. It is however a job to get it mixed up, but all in all "nice"! The only trouble I had was keeping the air hose from touching the interior of the tanks. "close quarters for spraying with the full siize HVLP gun".  I still have to fab new lids and install the baffles in the tanks, Here are some pics...
Also working on one of the large portlites it was in rough shape with 1/8 plexiglass rigged in with some silicone. After I cleaned it up I found that it had been puttied up, so I cleaned it all out and installed some FRP from Mcmaster and glued and clamped everything back together again, I used the router and cut a 1-1/4 rabbet 1/4" deep for the new 1/4 polycarbonate but I haven't decided exactly how I want to install the lens yet....thinking about gasket material and SS hardware...so I can change it out without any problem...but I've read alot about gluing with Silkaflex 295uv...any ideas? Here's a pic..of what it looks like..

Greg




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#110 [url]

Oct 24 11 4:51 AM


Greg,

The tanks came out great! I am assuming this is very hard, durable paint. For the portlites, it seems to me you have the choice of either making the lites easily removeable / replaceable, or practically permanent. If you are going with polycarbonite, you should plan on replacing them maybe every 5 years as even the scratch and UV treated types weather from the sun much more than acrylic. If the lites are smoked color, then the sealant you use, assuming it is black, won't show thru much if at all. I know it is not politically correct on any forum to mention silicone sealant, but frankly it is perfect for sealing polycarbonite lites. I used it on the Bristol and they never leaked a drop. That would be my recommendation for a permanent installation. For an easily removeable installation I would consider using Butyl sealant tape. The stuff is very sticky and stays soft and flexible and can be removed with acetone if you need to, Using Butyl tape would give you a replaceable system I think that would also be completely waterproof. Some things to think about, anyway.

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#111 [url]

Oct 24 11 10:19 AM

Dave,

If I used some gasket material from mcmaster along with some stainless hardware would that be ok for mounting the polycarbonate. I see quite a few pics where the portlite is mounted like that...

Greg

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#113 [url]

Nov 27 11 6:45 PM

Dave,

Thought maybe I'd give an update and the status of the window and tanks...

On the deadlite, I've added the 1/2" FRP trim to create the rabbet for the 3/8" acrylic deadlite which will be glued up with silkaflex UV295 paying close attention to the expansion gap that is needed between the acrylic and framing.


On the tanks, I installed FRP strips into the bottom of both the water and fuel tanks and recessed some 1/4" SS bolts into the strips so I could remove the baffles to inspect and service the tanks if necessary. Originally they were attached permantly installed with roving. Also I re-sanded all the tanks again to see just how tough the CeramKote really was. I used 80 grit paper per the spec. sheet and was just able to scuff it good enough for coat #2. Yes it's tough! money well spent! Now for the lids...


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#115 [url]

Nov 27 11 7:12 PM

Greg,

Thanks for the update. I really like the port frames. The tanks look good--I will have to order a gallon to use in lockers, etc. 

I spent the day wet sanding the bulwarks and caprails and put a second coat of epoxy on the cockpit teak.

Cheers,

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#116 [url]

Nov 28 11 7:24 AM

Oh, almost forgot how about that S3 gray WR155 primer...how sweet it is to clean up with water!! :)

-greg

Interesting you should mention the LPU primer. I have been wet sanding it this past weekend. Using 800 grade wet or dry, it is lovely stuff to sand.

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#117 [url]

Jan 8 12 5:16 PM

Dave,

Hope you don't mind, I thought it best keep all my Irwin stuff together!..Anyway after looking over the write-up on your chainplates I decided to check mine out! Ouch! not good:( just another story in the chapter of "I'm glad I found that!"...So how about a question...do these chainplates have to be made by a vendor? or can I order some stainless stock from Mcmaster or the other metal supplier you like and make them on my own...here are some pics of some of what I found! I wasn't going to say it this time but I changed my mind....I just wonder how the mast stayed up...remember the backstay completely cracked with only one bolt holding a 1" piece...unbelievable! glad I caught her in time!








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#118 [url]

Jan 8 12 7:24 PM



Hi Greg,

Yes I agree, they look pretty bad, lots of corrosion. You can certainly make your own,  and relatively easy if you have a polisher that can handle stainless. I would buy 316 stock from Online Metals in Seattle: http://www.onlinemetals.com/merchant.cfm?id=27&step=2&top_cat=0
They will cut the stock to length and I believe even polish it if you want. I bought 316 stock from them for the new back stay chainplate and and had my stainless steel guy drill and polish it. Unless you can do the drilling and polishing yourself I'm not sure that you would save any money over buying Schaefer chainplates, except the Schaefer's are 304, not 316. In retrospect I wish I had made all of them myself so that they would be 316 but I don't plan on having any leaks, so it shouldn't matter.

I would consider increasing the thickness of your chainplates over the originals, just for safety's sake--I consider it good insurance. Tell me why your chainplates are so darn long??

All the best,

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#119 [url]

Jan 10 12 8:04 PM

Dave,
 
Sorry for the delay....yeah...there long! turns out the knees are below the storage compartments so it's a long span to get contact! I'll get a pic to give you an idea..absolutely will make sure the new ones are up sized..I'm gonna follow your lead and do mine just like you did yours..."fantastic work"! Hey I'm curious though...the knees they all look fine and sound solid is that all I need to check or should I do more?

Greg

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#120 [url]

Jan 10 12 8:48 PM

Greg,

The knees may have some water intrusion since the chainplates are so rusted. I would drill a few 1/4" test holes to check for any punky wood. If you don't find any just fill the holes with epoxy.

Cheers,

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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