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susana

Fiberglass Sander

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#41 [url]

Apr 14 11 2:58 AM

Hello there,

Susana here, man i have to say this place is real cool, i have been keeping a eye on here from many months & thought its time now to post a comment to make all happy & start a conversation all along so people can come here & keep i touch & post questions to find resolution to the same & so on, i guess this is a good start to all that.

Hope all come along & start a revolution :-)

Catch you all later.

Cheers!!!


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greg

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#43 [url]

Apr 17 11 6:46 PM

Dave,

     I got back on the partition for the compression post this weekend...so I can get things level, then baqk to the rudder alignment.

Greg

Greg

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greg

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#44 [url]

May 4 11 9:11 PM

Hey Dave,

Hey FYI: Backup your drive......when your drive crashes it's not a good thing!!! finally back on square one again. So status on the partition and mast step...I was able to get Ed to bring me some Meranti BS1088 plywood from down your way to use for the partition, I thought it would be best to use it since it was in a critical spot with the compression post attaching to it and also being part of the head/shower....anyway I test fitted the panel and made sure it went in with no problems...making the template was a great idea! the panel went in great! I have some paperback teak veneer that I'm going to finish out the panel with. So with the panel in I stood the post up and wedged it back in it's original spot. Now I have to repair the bottom of the post "if you think it's ok to do"..and build some type of base for the post to sit on...do you remember the piece of steel channel and bondo I chiseled out that the post sat on? now I have to put something back...got any suggestions....maybe mcmaster glass blocks .....glassed in....but should it be just flat on top or maybe formed to except the post bottom...ah maybe a mount bracket with fasteners...the post is also screwed to the panel from inside the head...hows is the bristol's setup? Check these pics out and see what you think, hope you don't  mind so many...Oh yeah almost forgot I used some Home Depot exterior glue plywood for one of my lockers it to will be covered with paperback teak veneer too and completely sealed with West...do you think it will be ok? check the pic with the level....you can tell the Citation needs a leveling....then maybe I'll be able to get back to the rudder again.


Greg

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#45 [url]

May 5 11 9:58 AM

Greg,

That's a handsome looking compression post (except for the very bottom). I'm curious what it butts up against at the top--looks to be a headliner--and how forces are transmitted down from the mast step shoe on the cabin top to the compression post. I assume that the bottom will sit on top of ballast or solid fiberglass that is covering ballast? 

I would use some layers of 1/2" solid fiberglass from McMaster (1/2" because it is easier to cut) and build up epoxied layers. I would cut the bottom of the post off square, saturate it with epoxy, several coats. The new mast step should offer a tap in fit for the compression post and I would attach it to the fiberglass layers with a couple of 1/4" screws so that it cannot move (although since the post is screwed to the bulkhead you can belay what I said--it ain't goin no where).

The Bristol uses the U shaped door frrame of the head doorway as the compression posts...the two vertical frames of the door go down to transmit loads to the ballast. However Bristol does a very crappy job of it and it's one of the areas I will be shoring up when I get into the interior. I plan a similar layered block for each door frame--everything saturated in epoxy.

I like the work you are doing with the bulkheads. 

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#46 [url]

May 5 11 10:01 AM

Greg,

On the subject of drive backup, I have been using Carbonite cloud backup ( http://www.carbonite.com/lp/ppc/goog-mini-tm.aspx?utm_campaign=CB_-_TM_Handhold&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_content=Trademark&utm_term={QueryString}&match=s&adnumber=8146802821&mkwid=sxm3zeY0a&gclid=CPn5hoKl0agCFape7AodRDyrgQ. Does a great job and no worries. I think it's about 60.00 a year.

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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greg

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#47 [url]

May 8 11 7:36 PM

Dave,

     Thanks for the tip on Carbonite! I'll check it out, I bought an external drive though and backed up everything in the house for safe keeping! How about a couple of questions......The mast step ....2 of them.... one on deck...that the mast sets on....and should there have been another that the compression post also sat on...I only had a rusted piece of steel channel that I thought was used as a shim...I was planning on the 1/2 glass blocks to build the proper rised platform with a 1/4 stainless plate screws to the top then work on the post squaring it off and rebuild the rotted section..to the tap in fit you mentioned "I might need a little more help on the tap in fit" ! I thought about using glass block for the rotted bottom of the post what you think? or rebuild with teak or something. The other thing was the bulkhead..I glued the teak venner on it and have one coat of west layed on to seal everything. Now your sealing the cherry with west, block sanding to get it flat, 2 more coats of west more sanding then spraying satin LPU right..Just wanted to make sure I do it right...I want it to last.....Hey it's beautiful!!!! the veneer had some knots in it which really make it look too cool.....the grain in fantastic...and of course the west makes it look like glass....gotta pic if your curious!

Greg

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#48 [url]

May 9 11 2:19 PM

Greg,

There appears to be a headliner lining the underside of the cabintop. I would consider using your Multimaster to cut around the top of the compression post and remove the liner. That will let you see what is under there which is the first thing to do.

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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greg

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#50 [url]

May 9 11 6:50 PM

Let me know what you think..
Greg

Greg

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#51 [url]

May 10 11 5:27 AM

Greg,

If there is no headliner but instead solid glass I would simply be sure to butt the top of the compression post firmly against the underside of the cabintop. 

Yes I would remove the maststep plate on the top of the cabin and see what it looks like. If the cabin top is cored in that area I would remove the core and pour it solid with epoxy. 

By a tap in fit I mean a very firm fit so there is no vertical play. I would use thickened epoxy liberally on the bottom; trim the compression post off so that all rotten wood is removed. If the layers of fiberglass you are building extend up past the cabin sole because of the trimmed off rot I would simply paint the fiberglass white and I think it will look very unobtrusive.

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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greg

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#52 [url]

May 10 11 7:04 PM

Dave,

     There is the headliner....underneath....but as you get close "say 2"..." to the mast step area you can tell it's solid. "I don't know what was used though"....thickened whatever I would guess...I could check with the Irwin group to see if anyone knows what was used....but like you I like to know first hand!...beyond the doubt...you know what I mean....It's important!...I will check it out this weekend....from up top, maybe it would be better from underneath..what you think?.....Hey the deck is not cored....it's around 1/2 thick FRP....then gap of 3/4 to the liner .....Also yes I'm going to use FRP for the rotted bottom of the post and the orca white would look great on the bottom which will match the inside....
     Hey, I've been working on the bulkhead when I get in at night, and I'm sanding the epoxy layer....I used the 220 wet first to see how it cuts....It takes some time but can be done...still have little bubble dents though...like fish eyes...but for the most part it's ok but I decided to try the dry 220 and FYI: it left I guess epoxy dust it the fish eyes....:( so I used the wet over it again and thought it got the dust out but when it dryed they were still there...so I quit for the night.....it was hard to see with the light in the shop anyway...I need to get this figured out because I want to use the west on my cabinet doors..and handhold's etc...should I just be scuffing the coats of epoxy till I get all 3 coats on then start with the 220 and work my way down or do I have to get every coat close to perfect?? "That could take alot of time......then spray the LPU satin...

Greg


Greg

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#53 [url]

May 11 11 5:21 AM

Greg,

To eliminate the fish eyes I would put on perhaps two coats of epoxy at this point--just scrub the first coat with water and a 3M scrubby to remove any anime blush. Then block sand with 180 wet or dry used wet. It should cut thru the epoxy very quickly and level everything. Be careful of course not to cut thru all the layers. But that should fill any fish eyes or anything other irregularities. I would then go over it lightly with 320 or 400 grade wet or dry, again wet. Then you should be ready for your finish.

If you can remove the mast step on the cabintop I would go in that way and see what it looks like. Photos would be helpful when you get there.

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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greg

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#54 [url]

May 11 11 8:29 PM

Dave,

couldn't do it...the dust from the dry 220 embeded itself in grain of the veneer...I worked on it using the wet trying to get to the dust spots but no way....so I ended up 80 grit taking the epoxy off down to the veneer being very very careful not to create any damage..So I'll bring the veneer back to 220 which should be ok for a fresh start....Then decide what to do...I know for sure I will never ever use dry paper on epoxy when I'm using clear over it.

Greg

Greg

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#55 [url]

May 12 11 4:08 AM


I've never really used wet or dry paper dry (seems to defeat the purpose of the paper, if you ask me). I have had instances where the wet sanding muck embeds itself in to the tiny grains of the wood but I have found a stiff brush or a 3M pad will remove it easily.

Dave

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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greg

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#56 [url]

May 12 11 7:56 PM

Dave,

Yes....wet or dry used wet is no problem, I have never used wet/dry dry....that nuts.....I did however use a piece of regular 220 grit sandpaper which I shouldn't have....really it was just as an experiment to see what it would do.....it messed it up...to save it I had to take the epoxy completely off...So you say put a coat on let it cure overnight hit it with a 3M pad and some water put another coat on then same deal for the last coat then sand from 180 up...

Greg

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greg

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#57 [url]

May 14 11 8:16 PM

Dave,

Didn't let it get the best of me....Used the west again much better luck this time, didn't have bubble/fisheye this time...tomorrow I'll use some water and a green scotch brite pad and scuff the blush off and add another coat..

Greg

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greg

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#59 [url]

May 15 11 4:19 PM

Dave,

     I know this is probably boring stuff for you but anyway here are some pics of the progress...I'm glad I stuck with it! Hey let me mention that I used foam brushes this time which I think made a big difference...on more coat to go then the satin....what do you think spray or brush....also how coats of the LPU...let me know when you catch a minute.

Greg






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