Remove this ad
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#21 [url]

Oct 25 10 12:39 PM

Hi All
I have made a couple trips to my boat since my last post, anyway I have accomplished a fair bit of work on it as I stay on board when I can, I have a propane force ten cabin heater and it works well, remember i'm in Canada . In my last post I had sealed the hull deck joint with 10 oz tape so I have a few more pics of the final result before i paint it.




Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#22 [url]

Oct 25 10 1:05 PM

I have replaced the cabin port lights as well , I initially wanted to use lexan but after a lot of research and calling many places that do this kind of work, they all say that acrylic would be adequate and won't scratch as easily as lexan, so I decided on 1/4 in. thickness acrylic and long enough to cover both port light opening's with one long piece glued to the cabin structure with sika flex 295-uv .

I removed the original port lights and was amazed that there was only 3/16 at best holding them in place.



Click here to view the attachment

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#25 [url]

Oct 25 10 3:52 PM

I prepped the area around the port opening's by sanding the gel coat down to epoxy/glass for a glue surface area. I reinforced the coach sides with 1/4 in. mahogany ply slipped in between the headliner and coach's outer side, initially I wanted to epoxy this but it would have been very messy so i used a box of brass screws I had on hand , bronze would have been a better choice but the area should remain dry so brass should prove adequate. I used rubber faucet washers for spacers to prevent squeezing out all the adhesive




Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#26 [url]

Oct 25 10 4:33 PM

I had done a lot of research before deciding on the sika flex system. It is the one recommended by all the boat mfg and plastic window suppliers, and it does not need mechanical fasteners. my windows took a 300 ml tube for each side as well you need the cleaner and primer. I was in a bit of a rush once I had begun so I forgot to take a pic of the primed acrylic, you need to abrade and use the cleaner on the glue area of the window material before priming. I left the factory paper masking on the acrylic and masked with painters tape around the openings, the adhesive can be very messy so mask off the area you don't want gooey black, the cleaner comes in handy here as well. Preparation seemed to be 90 % of this job. I cut the tube nozzle at the largest V shape I could and laid a continuous bead around the  perimeter of the glue area. I found a 1/4 in in from the edge worked best and I tooled the squeeze out with a tongue depressor but a popsicle stick may be better. it's easier to tool the squeeze out than to try and fill in a gap later , you don't want any trapped air pockets. a razor blade works well for trimming the dry adhesive around the edge of the window, overall I am happy with the results and the look, I think it will be a vast improvement over the original


Click here to view the attachment

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#29 [url]

Oct 25 10 7:50 PM

Hi David
I will be sure to get some photos from inside, I hope I can get a couple of day trips to the boat before the snow flies here. The P/O had what seems like a dozen different curtain arrangements over the yrs. so there are many small holes around the port lights. I suppose I will fill them with thickened epoxy, fair it and paint.
I am not sure if you noticed but the p/o also added a spade rudder further aft, it works fine and I’ve decided to keep it , I have sold the old grey marine engine and we've removed it, I wanted the space inside for other things so I plan on using a small outboard on a transom bracket. I was considering even trying oars. I have begun to seal up the old rudder and prop armature I have posted a few pic's, I would like any feedback you have






Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   

#30 [url]

Oct 26 10 4:46 AM

I'm assuming that is a block of styrofoam you have filled the prop cavity with? What are your plans for a layup schedule to tie the rudder to the keel? Also, I'd love to see how the PO handled the rudder post bearings and tube for the spade rudder? Did he seal the lazarette hatch? How did he strengthen the new stern tube and is the new rudder post solid or a pipe? 

David

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#31 [url]

Oct 28 10 9:58 AM

Hi David
Yes that is a piece of styrofoam in the cavity. it is held in place with glass tabbing. it's not easy to see the glass tape as it becomes transparent when whetted out.
 There is a continuous layer of tape on both sides of the rudder's leading edge/ keel gap. I also glassed the rudder shoe/keel area.
The wider gap at the top of the rudder/hull area is glassed on both sides, the center of the tape on each side touches each other in the gap making it pretty strong. the gap around the styrofoam  is partially filled with 3M short strand filler which I ran out of. I tried using west epoxy with micro balloons to fill the gap (the chocolate colored covering) but it takes a lot of balloons to thicken it so it does not sag. I had to keep smoothing it till it kicked. I will pick up some more short strand filler to finish the gap on my next trip, and save what micro baloons I have left for the final faring. I believe The spade rudder post  is made of SS pipe, the tube is SS or aluminum and protrudes through a hole in the hull about 1/2 in. and runs up through the lazarette and exits in the space just forward of the hatch lid and the main sheet traveler it appears to well sealed at the hull and deck with thickened epoxy and glass. I will take some pic's of the installation on my next trip as well.The bearing's could be Teflon  or a nylon and need replacing.  the existing spade rudder has some bleeding rust issues probably from water saturation and the confined SS internal webbing so I plan on making or adapting a rudder in the near future, possibly a better design a kick up would be great but probably would be difficult to make it strong enough, what do you think? what about a transom hung rudder?

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   
avatar

johnbro

Fiberglass Sander

Posts: 3

#32 [url]

Oct 28 10 2:21 PM

Jumping in here a bit late, but consider this: there's an IR device that can non-intrusively show you exactly where you have water in your coring, and where it's dry. You'll have to pay someone to come out and do it, but it's cheaper than ripping your entire boat apart (consider the hull for example) and when you're done, you'll know you got all the wet spots. If you've got water intrusion in the deck coring I would argue that the topsides of the hull may be compromised as well.

I know Townsend Bay Marine in Port Townsend, WA, has used this method on boats in the past. They had an outside guy come in and do it. I think they have an even cheaper way to do this now.

Quote    Reply   

#33 [url]

Oct 29 10 5:30 AM


You may already be familiar with this rudder conversion to Fenix, a Cape Dory:

http://www.sbastro.com/FeNIX/Projects/ProjectsExteriorFS.htm

Notice that he removed the original rudder--probably more to accommodate the prop than anything else, but uses a heavily reinforced skeg. I think a transom-hung rudder would also need a skeg of some kind. I have rarely seem boats with freely-hung spade rudders that do not show stress fractures at the point that the rudder post enters the hull. Obviously the forces at that point can be enormous. If you are seeing rust weeping from the spade rudder, I would question the alloy of stainless used as well as the welds to the internal webbing. 

I would encourage you to add increasingly wider layers of 24 oz biax cloth to the rudder/keel joint (after grinding away the gelcoat layer to both the rudder and the keel to get to solid glass. If you are merely fiberglassing to the clean gelcoat, the layup will have little strength and eventually tear off the gelcoat layer.) 
I would use at least 6 layers of biax, each overlapping the previously epoxied layer while that layer is still curing.  I would make the complete layup at least 14 inches wide.

Good luck with the project and please post more pictures when you can.

David




Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

Quote    Reply   

#34 [url]

Nov 2 10 8:49 AM

That would sure help if you knew of some soft spots but wanted to test the rest of your decks without having to drill test holes. I'm surprised it is not used in surveys.

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

Quote    Reply   
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#35 [url]

Apr 18 11 6:06 PM

Hi All
It's been a long winter here, it seems to refuse to give in as it snowed today! anyway I have been chipping away at my boat projects and i have decided on a new auxiliary, and have come up with a mount I hope will suffice, any suggestions would be great. I'm waiting for a few warm days to do the final epoxy work that needs to get done before the 2nd of may, it's my launch date. 
 





Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#37 [url]

Apr 23 11 6:33 AM

Hi
The motor is a 6 H.P.  it is the sail pro ultra long shaft version, and is supplied with the high thrust prop which is supposed to develop the full rpm to produce 6 hp. it also comes with alternator and charging cable. I realize this motor is quite small for a boat this size  but many factors influenced my decision, primarily my aging back. I also relied on the experience of a guy named James Baldwin of
http://www.atomvoyages.com/ there is a lot of info on his site regarding cruising in small sailboats.
He helped me to come up with an adapter to mount the motor bracket on the transom.

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#39 [url]

May 12 11 7:56 AM

Hi All

Had to move the launch date to may 18 because of the wet spring here. I had unfinished projects on the go, some which are finally complete i.e. the rudder/ keel joint prop cavity fill in. it was a much bigger job than I anticipated. I've posted some pic's





Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   
avatar

67bristol29

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 27

#40 [url]

May 23 11 4:21 PM

Hi all
well I finally got the boat launched, I headed out for a trip of about 80 miles over two days, there was enough wind on day 1 to actually get the sails up for a few hours. we (My dog and I) made about 20 miles and then anchored for the night. The following day the lake was glassy  calm so we ended up motoring the remaining 60 miles. The motor worked far better than ever thought possible, making 5.5 -6.0 knots  and burned 15 liters of gas. pictures are of port dover, the one in the center with tinted windows is mine. A temporary sheet block set up until i get the bulwarks on. and motoring...cheers




Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

67 Bristol 29 # 11 " Abigale"

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help