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pughgl

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 26

#22 [url]

Apr 4 10 6:58 PM

Hi Christopher.
Do you have pics showing the cockpit controls on your boat? And close up pics showing the mounting of the engine? I got a replacement A4 but never saw how the old one was installed and have no contols either.I assume that yours has an Atomic 4

Thanks
Glenn

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pughgl

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 26

#27 [url]

Apr 9 10 12:52 PM

Really, snow?? Wow we have been so lucky here in Kingston Ontario.
I have been to the boat to clean but haven't worked on the engine. Overtime and kids things have kept me busy. I did go there when it was raining and saw that there are a few drips along the toe rail bolts.  Maybe David could answer this one. I started tightening the nuts for the toe rail and the hull seam but by it was the next day and it had stopped raining and dripping so I couldn't tell if I was helping so I stopped. Could I hurt anything by doing this? I wasn't tightening them down hard just snug. I have a wooden toe rail. I also have some stanction rebedding to do I see.  3M 5200??? for rebedding?
 
Thanks for the reply
Glenn


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pughgl

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 26

#28 [url]

Apr 9 10 7:24 PM

Does anyone have pics of the cockpit controls. I am trying to have my dad find me some in Florida but my boat didn't come with any  so I don't know what they look like. I figure that as long as they come off an atomic four I will be alright. Maybe you could snap a pic of that too Christopher if you get a chance. But if someone has pics now that would be great because dad will be coming home soon and needs to know what I need.
 
Thanks
 Glenn

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christian1470

Fiberglass Sander

Posts: 5

#29 [url]

Apr 10 10 6:40 AM

Hi Glenn,

  about that 5200, it's a great product that will hold pretty much forever and it does have it's uses but you would be much better off using sikaflex 241 or 3M 101 to re-bed any deck hardware. The reason for this is that sooner or later you will probably want to actually remove some of the items that you have re-bedded. 5200 is entirely too tenacious for this and you will most likely end up tearing up some fiberglass upon removal.  NEVER bed wood down with 5200 if there is any chance you will want to remove that piece later(in one piece, that is).  In my opinion, 5200 is overused, even 4200 is too strong for most applications and any boat that has had everything bedded with 5200 is a complete nuisance.
 As for your engine controls, any bulkhead mounted shift/throttle arrangement will do.  inboard controls are pretty standard, they all use teleflex style shift and throttle cables.  Take a look through the west catalog, or cruise ebay for a used one.  Morse is a great, well trusted brand, but others work fine as well.
   A note on the atomic four.  There is nothing wrong with dropping another one in your boat, but seeing as you don't have one yet, perhaps you should also be looking for a small diesel.  Universal made one that dropped right over the old atomic four engine mounts, others may need some modification to the engine beds.  It's a bit more work, but you must consider that seeing as the old engine has already been removed, a lot of the work has already been done, so if you have the means to repower with diesel, now would be the time to do it.
  Finally, a comment on the transom/outboard combo.  Purely academic at this point, but when considering mounting any outboard on a transom, it all comes down to the bracket, it's location, and how firmly it is mounted.  Others have expressed deep worries about hanging a 30hp on the transom of your boat. Before getting too worked up about it, one must consider that the sternpost and transom have been built to carry the load of the backstay, which, under way in a sea, produces much larger stresses than the weight or thrust of a 30hp outboard.  The key, of course, would be to hang it properly. w\Which means using a strong, "gill bracket" type mount for the engine,  properly mounted with sufficient backing plates, preferably on centerline, stradling the sternpost, etc.  All that being said, despite it's usefulness, I tend to think any outboard bolted on the back of a bristol 29 as somewhat of an abomination.  A "hack" solution, if you will.  Granted, their is something to be said for the economy and "quick fix" aspects of that route, and sailing with an outboard off the transom is much preferred to a boat on the mooring or still on the hard with a dead or nonexistent inboard.  Just not something I would want to consider properly fixed, but rather a temporary solution.
 Christian

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#30 [url]

Apr 11 10 7:04 AM


Folks,

 Let's keep these remarks pertinent to restoring, repairing or improving older fiberglass sailboats and Bristols in particular, This is not a forum to advocate risky engineering ideas like hanging large outboards on the sterns of older sailboats, nor is it a forum to suggest shortcuts that would reduce the safety of the boat or the crew. 

Thanks,

 

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#31 [url]

Apr 11 10 7:41 AM




Really, snow?? Wow we have been so lucky here in Kingston Ontario. I have been to the boat to clean but haven't worked on the engine. Overtime and kids things have kept me busy. I did go there when it was raining and saw that there are a few drips along the toe rail bolts.  Maybe David could answer this one. I started tightening the nuts for the toe rail and the hull seam but by it was the next day and it had stopped raining and dripping so I couldn't tell if I was helping so I stopped. Could I hurt anything by doing this? I wasn't tightening them down hard just snug. I have a wooden toe rail. I also have some stanction rebedding to do I see.  3M 5200??? for rebedding?  Thanks for the reply Glenn

-pughgl

A usual source of leaks is the genoa track bolts. You can try tightening them but the track may need to be rebedded. If you rebed the track I would use 5200 or Sikaflex 292--both are strong adhesives. If you remove the track, bear in mind that the yard uses two upside down bolts as track stops at the ends of each track to prevent the genoa car from sliding off the track. The bolts are also a potential source of leak and must be bedded from under the head, which is inside the boat. Just remove the nut, tap the bolt down and then apply bedding compound liberally under the head. I would NOT use a strong adhesive here since you will want to be able to remove / replace your cars in the future. 

As to how tight you can tighten your toerail--you can tighten it as tight as you can get it without stripping anything.

Stanchion bases--I would remove then, clean the bases thoroughly, clean the backing blocks inside the boat and rebed them with a strong adhesive. 5200 is indeed difficult to remove, but it can be removed safely using a debonder. 

Another area that can cause leaks that look like they are coming from your toerail are the fixed ports. If they are leaking the water will run down the area between the cabinside and the liner and exit somewhere at the edge of the liner (close to the towrail screws) and drip there--often near the quarter berths, Take a look at the write up I did on how to properly rebed the fixed portlights:
http://bristol29forum.lefora.com/2009/05/12/how-to-replace-the-plastic-in-the-bristol-fixed-po/#post0

Good luck,

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#33 [url]

Apr 13 10 6:17 AM

The original muffler was built of copper and was a water-jacketted dry exhaulst system that ran from the engine, under the cockpit and through the lazarette. It typically leaks carbon monoxide as well as cooling water. I would convert to a proper water lift mufler and exhaust hose. This is the muffler I used when I repowered my B29 in 1988:
http://www.centekindustries.com/vernaliftfig3.html

It is fiberglass and has worked very well.


Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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#35 [url]

Apr 13 10 6:05 PM

Somebody check me on this, but I believe the A-4 uses a 1-5/8" hose from the exhaust manifold to the muffler. So that would be 1.63" or model number
1500035 which is about 10.5" x 6.3" or if you can fit a larger capacity muffler 
1500037 which is about 14" x 9"

The size of the muffler must be able to hold all the water in the exhaust hose from the muffler outlet to the transom outlet to keep the water from backing up into the engine. I haven't measured it in about 20 years but I think mine is 14 x 8 inches.

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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pughgl

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 26

#36 [url]

Apr 18 10 7:35 AM

Thanks David.
I contacted the Po of the Atomic 4 I bought and he had the muffler so I went and got it. It is a Vetus waterlock LP 40. I guess that I just have to figure where I should mount it and how to pipe it. I am going to talk to a Marine machanic that I found has Atomic 4 experience and PARTS!! tomorrow so I hope to get advice from him as well.

Thanks again for the help. I appreciate you taking the to reply.

Oh, and I think since the PO of the boat already has the holes drilled I am going to put a 9.9 on the back (maybe) just to get me in the water. I still am not sure how long it will be until the A4 is running. The PO ran one on it last year for the summer and, as you advised, I checked to make sure the stern did not show any signs of stress. But who knows maybe this week she will start up and away we go. I just don't want to get stuck.

Glenn 

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#37 [url]

Apr 18 10 8:32 AM

Glenn,

The 9.9 hp outboard should do fine on the transom. It will be limited in powering the boat in any sort of seas, but that is true of any outboard. My concern was for the weight of a 30 hp engine plus the weight of the bracket and the stresses it would impose on the transom. It was never built for that kind of stress and torque and regardless of what the PO planned, it would not be a safe engineering practice. The advantage of the inboard will be much better gas mileage than the outboard; the inboard will throw a much larger prop than the outboard with more pitch plus the inboard is very quiet and smooth compared to the outboard.

The Vetus is a good muffler although I am puzzled as to where you would have room for it. Keep in mind that the muffler must be at least 12 inches below the exhaust manifold; otherwise you risk back flooding your engine with sea water. Please keep me posted as I would like to install that muffler as well!

David

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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