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fullkeel

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Dec 12 09 4:58 PM

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Hi David, would you happen to know off hand how thick the cabin sides are including the thickness of the headliner? I am getting ready to replace the ports.

Its storming hear in San Francisco and I am just trying to save my self a trip down to the boat to work in the rain.

thanks.  Chase

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fullkeel

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#1 [url]

Dec 12 09 5:47 PM

Ok possible change of plans.  For cost, simplicity and strength reasons I may just through bolt polycarbonate to replace all the ports.  I know this wont be all that nice in the sense that I will not be able to open the ports for ventilation. But I am confident this approach would be exceedingly strong and leak proof.

 

My question is this.  I want to use carriage bolts because I think they will look good from the exterior and their low profile will not be prone to snags.  I wont be able to cut square holes so I want to know if I slightly over drill the hole just large enough seat the bolt can I fill the area around it with epoxy?  Will epoxy react with the polycarbonate?

 

Thanks.  Chase

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#2 [url]

Dec 12 09 10:04 PM

Chase,

Epoxy should not cause any problems with polycarbonate, but I don't have any personal experience with gluing polycarbonate. One thing to keep in mind is that acrylic and polycarbonate both expand and contract quite a bit with heat and cold, so normally mounting holes are drilled a bit oversized to account for the expansion--otherwise the polycarbonate could crack at the bolt hole. I don't know what would happen if you epoxied the carriage bolt heads to the poly--I'm not saying it wouldn't work, I just haven't heard of that being done before.

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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fullkeel

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Posts: 43

#3 [url]

Dec 12 09 10:14 PM

hi david, thanks for the info.  Is there another materiel you might recommend other than polycarbonate, something that will not shrink/expand as much with temp changes?  

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#4 [url]

Dec 13 09 7:53 AM




Have you considered the Beckson 5x12 ports for the opening ports on the Bristol? They are extremely strong and not very expensive--maybe a bit over $100.00 per port. http://www.defender.com/product.jsp?path=-1|6880|296549|47058&id=669893 

The least expensive and strongest option for the fixed ports (if you will be sailing offshore)  would be to replace the existing plastic with polycarbonate and drill out the bolt holes in the aluminum frames, and thru bolt them with cap nuts for a finished look (cap nuts on the outside).


Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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fullkeel

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 43

#5 [url]

Dec 13 09 8:46 AM


Here is what I was thinking of using for the four forward ports:

 

http://www.newfoundmetals.com/catalog/trimatrix1.html

 

They look like a solid design with easy installation.  My only concern is that due to the current cutouts I would need to enlarge the cutouts to accommodate the 7x15 design. Not a big deal, but still not sure if the overall dimensions of this port will be too big.

 

I like the through bolt idea for the larger fixed ports. Could I use stainless with the aluminum frames or would I need to get aluminum fasteners?

 

 

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#6 [url]

Dec 14 09 6:07 AM


I think the 7x15's would be too large (height wise), but the 5x12's would probably work. I'm not a fan of Newfound Metals ports, but many people are.

The stainless thrubolts aren't a problem in the aluminum frames. Just use nylon washers on either side of the frame where the stainless head and capnut would touch the aluminum. I would use blue loctite on the threads.

David

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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