Remove this ad
avatar

fullkeel

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 43

Lead

Jul 21 09 8:05 AM

Tags : :

David (or anyone else),
 
I am thinking about having a new and stronger bow pulpit made, if i am going to do this i think i will have the shape changed such that it will have two bars and be much stronger than the hoop design that is currently on it.  If do this I will probably need to replace my head sail arrangement as I currently have a self tending jib that would probably hit the pulpit or top life line, if i take it up to 24 inches as i entend to do.  I am considering adding roller furling and would like to know what brands I should look at.
 
Thanks.

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Remove this ad

#1 [url]

Jul 22 09 6:31 AM

So, from your description I am guessing that your lifelines terminate down close to the aft bases of the pullpit now? Even if you install a two rail pullpit I imagine you could still secure your lifelines down lower at the pullpit and they might not interfere with the jib boom.

For roller furling, I use a Hood unit that I have had on the boat for about 15 years. It has worked well and never failed to unroll and roll up the genoa. It is a Seafurl SL 707.
http://www.hoodyachtsystems.com/pdf%20files/sl707data.pdf
The advantage to me is lube free bearings--just rinse them with fresh water occasionally, and the forestay remains integral to the unit--it fits down over the existing turnbuckle.

Another excellent furler is the ProFurl. Harkens are also very reliable. I think the technology has gotten to the point with furlers that it is more a case of your budget deciding what to install.

Good luck!

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

Quote    Reply   
avatar

fullkeel

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 43

#2 [url]

Jul 23 09 4:18 PM

That is correct, at the moment the single live lines do terminate at the base of the bow pulpit.  My plan is to have white water marine in MI make a new double bar type bow pulpit and stern rail that will put the top life line mount 24" above the deck.  I am specifiying this height so the boat will qualify for the single handed transpac. 
 
Thanks for the info on the roller furling.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

fullkeel

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 43

#4 [url]

Jul 28 09 6:14 PM

Hi David,

i would like to hear more of your opinion about the jib boom, why you think it is dangerous etc.

I had liked it because it is self tacking and in general makes things pretty easy.  That said, I am at an inflection point and would be open to ditching it.  

Cheers.  Chase

Quote    Reply   

#5 [url]

Jul 28 09 6:52 PM



Hi Chase,

A jib boom is a great gift to single handing when the sailing is easy or when you have to tack in tight spaces. But it can be a real hazzard at night when you have to go up on the weather deck. It can wang around, bumping you when you least need it to, or jibe as you are on the foredeck. It can make reefing the jib much more difficult and possibly dangerous (without a fulrer). With a furler the jib boom adds complexity to the furling rigging. When you are not flying your jib and wish to rig an inner forestay for a storm jib, it has to be secured along the foredeck, providing an 11 foot long log for you to trip over. I also think your boat really needs more jib than the 100 percent jib that the jib boom limits you to. The boat was designed for a 135 to 150 percent genny. An overlapping jib will give you a slot between jib and main that greatly increases performance. An overlapping jib to a point helps to reduce weatherhelm. Finally if you wish to continue to have a self tended jib, you can always rig it to a bridle or traveller forward of the mast and continue to have a self tending jib that can be reduced in size with a furler, but not have the jib boom. As a postscript, a jib boom prevents you from carrying a dinghy on the foredeck.

David

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

Quote    Reply   
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help