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fullkeel

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 43

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Apr 13 09 4:49 PM

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To modify the mast head to be closed, and to convert to all rope halyards that cannot jump, is the modification simple and inexpensive?  Can a new mast head be purchased off the shelf or does it need to be fabricated from scratch?
 
Also what does it cost to replace the cast aluminum spreader sockets with ss ones?
 
Thanks.

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#1 [url]

Apr 13 09 8:10 PM




The masts were made at Bristol Yachts for these boats as were the masthead, and the mast shoe. I doubt that you could find an off the shelf closed masthead for the mast, but the only folks who might have one is Rig-Rite, Inc. Phone: (001) 401-739-1140 -- FAX: (001) 401-739-1149www.RigRite.com

If they don't have an enclosed masthead, you will need to do what I did. Call MetalMast Marine now known as 
DCProducts 860-908-9409 (AKA Metalmast) 275 Kate Bowning Rd. Plainfield, CT 06374

Dick Conte and the folks there were directly involved in Bristol spars in the 1960's. They do beautiful work at a very reasonable price. They made my masthead and new spreaders and spreader sockets.

Here are some photos of the masthead I had MetalMast marine build me:
http://bristol29.com/Projects/Masthead/masthead.htm

And, here is one of the stainless spreader sockets:



David


Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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pughgl

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 26

#2 [url]

May 17 10 7:33 PM

Hi David.

I am almost in the water. I am now working on lighting on the mast. Being a newbie to sailing I am just figuring out that the PO removed all of the mast lighting and cut the wires. I tried to remove my mast head, which looks to be closed, but the bolts wouldn't turn except one which spun. Not sure what to think. I was thinking of just drilling a hole where the old wire sticks out and running all new wire through that hole. I am going to the marine supply tomorrow and seeing if they have some kind of a harness. Also the rollers in the masthead for the sheets are some kind of composite material and look like they are rough. Anyway, will try and get some pro help to make sure the the rollers are ok. Just wanted to hear your opinion. Also , I will take a flashlight tomorrow and look up in the mast to see how hard it would be to fish the wire through. Maybe take a pic of the masthead as well.


Thanks, you opinion is always appreciated.
Glenn


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#3 [url]

May 18 10 7:00 AM

Hi Glenn,



Bristol may have changed masthead designs over the years (or you may have a different masthead box installed by a previous owner). The original masthead box is attached with thru-bolts that also fasten the main shroud mast tangs to the mast. It uses 3 ¼” bolts. It sounds like your masthead box is attached using tapped holes thru the mast wall and into the flange of the masthead box. If the box is closed, there probably isn’t a need to remove it from the mast. You can order new sheaves for the masthead and install them without removing the box unit. However, you may need to drill out the screws that are stripped to get your masthead box off. You might also try using an impact screw driver. (Undoubtedly, the stainless screws have corroded in the aluminum threads and seized. You can prevent this in the future by using a dab of latex house caulking on the threads as you screw them into the tapped hole. The caulking will also lock the screw in place.)

The wires for radio antenna and the masthead light(s) exit the mast below the masthead via holes. If you have no holes you can drill them. You can use a plumber’s fish wire or even a small diameter rigging wire (or some galvanized wire from Home Depot) to fish new wires thru the mast (remember to fish a separate set for the steaming light at the spreaders). You might also take this opportunity to run some PVC pipe down your mast to hold and protect the wires. Once you have all your wires in place, I would add a fish string of light strong line so that you can use it anytime in the future.

Masthead sheaves: measure the diameter of the center hole and the width. You can order new ones from Rigrite, from the folks at MetalMast (see above in this tread for contact info) or from Garhauer or others. The sheaves you have are most likely Bakealite (a popular material in the 60’s for sheaves). If they are chewed up it is probably from frayed halyard wire. They can be sanded to clean them up.
Some photos would be very helpful for me to be more specific.


David




Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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pughgl

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Posts: 26

#4 [url]

May 18 10 5:55 PM

Thanks for the reply David.
Of coarse I forgot the camera today again. I removed the sheaves today and one did have the center bushing gone. i will take it to the marina tomorrow to see if they can match it up. The PO wasn't using halyard wires, just rope all they way. I got mixed answers from people that I asked about whether this was ok so will leave it that way for now. Will make sure that the sheaves that I get will handle the size of rope though.

Thanks again
Glenn

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rpicciotto2004

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 29

#5 [url]

Nov 29 12 7:38 PM


hello david.  i need a spinnaker halyard crane and, as usual, the first place i went for info was your site, and the forum.  there, i found the address for dick conte. so... after removing the mast head, i drove the sixty miles or so from my house to plainfield, ct. where i found the somewhat secluded place set in wooded hills where dick works.  he is a warm, welcoming, obviously knowledgeable man. it was not only quite a delight to talk to him, but he very quickly sketched what he could do, and at a very reasonable price.
meeting people such as him is as much a pleasure for me as working on my boat or sailing, and once again i'm grateful to you for your help. photographs will eventually follow.

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#6 [url]

Nov 30 12 9:21 AM

I'm glad you got to talk to Dick Conte. And I agree with you completely, it is a real pleasure meeting people who are so generous with their time and knowledge--it is the best part of boat owning and teaches us all to pay it forward to those we are yet to meet.

Best regards,

David

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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