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Mar 30 09 6:07 PM

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Welcome aboard!  I've started a new forum about restoring and improving older fiberglass sailboats. Please join, ask questions, share knowledge, and tell us about your projects. Consider this your forum and a clearing house of information for experts and newbees alike.

This forum is an offshoot of my website Bristol29.com, in which I detail the restoration and modifications to my 1971 Bristol 29. I receive a lot of email from visitors to my site with specific questions and comments about older Bristols they may be fancying to buy, or Bristol models they own and want to repair, improve or modify. I also receive a lot of mail from owners of other older sailboats for help, questions, comments. So it seems natrual to create a discussion board in which we can all participate. Please join and feel part of this community. We all share something in common: a love for older, classic looking sailboats.

Feel free to email me at davebro31 @ gmail dot com.



Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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greg

Captain

Posts: 204

#1 [url]

Apr 4 09 7:11 AM

Hey Dave,

     I hope you don't mind an Irwin owner joining up! I'd be lost without the Bristol29 website, and all your expertice. Still hard at work on the "Ole Citation" that sits right outside the garage! The forum will be great! now I can bug your guys with all kinds of questions, if you'll let me..

Greg

Greg

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greg

Captain

Posts: 204

#3 [url]

May 20 09 7:16 PM

Dave,
 
Great info on the mast head...You alway have something interesting to read....Gotta check mine out in the morning!  Like you afternoon rains here so can't work on the deck hatch combings. I decided if it showers this weekend ill probably sand some on the bottom, or dig the hole so I can get the rudder out.
 
see ya
Greg

Greg

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reuben

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 20

#5 [url]

Jun 11 09 11:05 AM

Dear David,

I want to thank you for your site and now this forum. I am with a non-profit using seamanship training among at-risk youth in the out-islands of the Bahamas. Last year we bought a '69 B29 to restore with the boys, and use in our program. We have re-rigged it, and we are involved in a host of other restoration projects. I am thrilled to be able to have a forum specifically for the B29.

Sincerely,
Reuben

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#6 [url]

Jun 11 09 12:20 PM

Hi Reuben,

Welcome aboard! I'm pleased to hear of your interest in the B29 and think what a great thing to do for at risk youth! Where in the Bahamas is the program located? Please post pictures of your projects and if you will let me know more details of your Bristol 29 I would like to add the information to my bristol website as well. I try to document every B29 that I can find.

Fair winds and best wishes,

David

Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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reuben

Able Bodied Seaman

Posts: 20

#7 [url]

Jun 11 09 1:05 PM

David,

Thank you for the welcome aboard. We are located on Long Island in the settlement of Salt Pond. This is the island south of George Town in Great Exuma--cruising mecca of the Bahamas.

 I have 9 high school aged boys in our program. We have been developing the seamanship program that is working toward the guys getting a Bahamian B class captain's license while developing character at the same time.

Our organization bought the '69 Bristol 29 "Saltair" from a local guy who had bought it some 12 years ago and left her on the hard to deteriorate badly. The hull is sound with no blisters, but she needs a lot of work. The boys have been involved in the refit so that they will be able to get some invaluable yacht work experience (more vocational skills). Also we will know the boat inside out for when we're using it for sail training and inter-island exploration.

The rig had been blown down in a hurricane, and we have been rebuilding it with 1/4" 1x19 and Hi-mod fittings. We bought all the hardware and wire rope from riggingonly.com--very good compnay. We developed a mast stepping system and stepped the mast by hand.

the engine is an individually marinized Kubota z600 tractor engine-- which i am thrilled about.

We don't have a lot of ready resources here so a lot of the restoration has to be done with a lot of inginuity and assistance from local friends.

I have tons of comments and questions so again, I am thrilled to be part of this forum .

Reuben

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larsvanness

Fiberglass Sander

Posts: 4

#10 [url]

Jan 30 13 1:19 PM

Hi David and everyone else that is still interested in this forum. Well, today we finally took possession of a Bristol 29 Hull No. 166 from Karl's Boat Shop here on Cape Cod. Now to cut to the chase. I have very recently been reading as much literature regarding gelcoat blisters and boat box as I can find, both here on the web and books. The boat has many layers of accumulated bottom paint quite a bit of which is chipping and flaking, so I used a thin putty blade and a utility knife to get behind some of it in various areas around the hull bottom. I have not seen any sign of blistering although there is some minor localized hull damage which appears to have been badly repaired. The question is this --should I be relieved or concerned regarding the apparent lack of blisters? Relief on the one hand that this boat may have avoided this obvious scourge or concern that -- a. I do not have enough experience to know what to look for, b. that blistering might be more difficult to identify than just by simply scraping some loose bottom paint. Looking forward sharing more of experiences with every one as we acquire them.

Patrick and Vera

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#11 [url]

Feb 6 13 10:50 AM



Hi Patrick,



Congratulations on your B29, the younger sister to my boat (#165). As for blistering, there is mostly hype and misinformation on the web and in many books on the subject of blistering. Ultimately, boats like ours built in the late 60’s or early 70’s before the oil embargo and the drastic rise in oil prices are not really subject to extensive blistering. I would be more surprised if you told me your boat was badly blistered. My B29 has been continuously in very warm tropical waters for most of its life and only had a couple of quarter sized blisters. And, yes, if your boat has blisters you will be able to see them even through many layers of old bottom paint. They will show as a half round bulge.

Ultimately, even if your boat had a lot of blisters, they will not sink you. I have seen many late 70’s and 1980’s  Hunters, Morgans, Irwins, and Island Packets that were so pocked with huge blisters that I’m sure the boats would lose half a knot of speed. But, they didn’t sink.

Finally, my two cents worth, but let me say emphatically, that what has come to be the standard boatyard repair for blisters—the gelcoat planed off—is only a huge pile of money in the pockets of the yards; not a viable solution for blistering.. Don’t waste your money; or if you feel really compelled to, send it to me instead! If you find blisters, sand them down to clean fiberglass, clean them with acetone and fill them with thickened epoxy—and go sailing!

If you decide you simply must get all that old bottom paint off, you might consider applying a half dozen coats of epoxy prior to repainting. It is good protection to 40 – 50 year old gelcoat.


Cheers,


David


Restoring a Bristol 29 in my backyard. www.bristol29.com

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larsvanness

Fiberglass Sander

Posts: 4

#12 [url]

Feb 6 13 5:02 PM

Hi David and thank you very much for responding. And welcome home BTW. We are proud to have officially become a part of an exclusive club--B 29 owners!  What a relief. Thanks for the positive feedback regarding the gelcoat blistering issue. Well, I have scraped a bit more bottom paint (and my wife has too) and there seems to be no sign whatever of the dreaded pox. We will begin posting photos and as you can imagine we will begin regular correspondence with you and the forum members as we sink our teeth into this project. Short term funds are limited so I will prioritize repairs and renovation on what appears to be a badly neglected but otherwise sound boat. Long term funds will be sufficient to bring the boat up to yachting community standards of safety, seaworthiness and elegance. And as for sending you money, we will be only too happy to contribute to the maintenance of such a valuable blog site to the boating community. Thanks for being available to all of us and for your passion and keen insights for the Bristol 29. Cheers from Patrick and Vera, West Harwich, Mass

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larsvanness

Fiberglass Sander

Posts: 4

#13 [url]

Aug 17 13 6:23 AM

Well, it's seems to be quiet here. Looks like everyone is enjoying the sailing season and again putting off repairs until fall. Finally had the boat moved to the yard in Harwich where we can begin restoration. Previously the boat was on the hard in Yarmouth and subject to municipal restrictions regarding what could and couldn't be done in the lot behind the consignment shop. So, I will post photos and ask questions of a technical nature as we dive into this project. We plan to continue removing the many layers of bottom paint, then sanding, fairing and barrier coating before the final painting to the hull below the water line, then tackle the topside gelcoat repairs and engine overhaul. All the best to all you forum readers and to David as well.





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